Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Webinar feedback page

Friday, January 13th, 2017

Title-24, Title-24

“I have never attended a webinar before and was unsure what to expect, but I have to say that it was awesome.  You did a great job explaining the material thoroughly, and not over explaining it too much.  I think I need to sit through it again just to make it sink in.  I’m going to ask my building department that they sign me up for all of your classes that pertain to the new energy code.  Thanks again!

Ray, City of Oroville

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“Thanks so much for the webinar on Tuesday.  There were 8 of us attending and we all found it informative and easy to follow along with.  We’ll be attending more of your webinars.  Please keep us posted.”

City of Walnut Creek

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“That was one of the best webinars I’ve ever attended.  Clear, concise, linear, well moderated, and presented.  You’ve got my recommendation if you ever need it.”

Christopher

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“I just wanted to let you know that I thought the presentation yesterday was excellent!  You presented the material in an engaging fashion, and the information was easy to comprehend.”

Tracy

Title-24, Title-24

“Thank you for the informative webinar you hosted yesterday.  I enjoyed it, and you made the new code easy to understand.”

Lennart

Title-24, Title-24

“I took your changes to the Title-24 residential energy code webinar recently and thought it was very informative and clear – thank you.”

Katherine

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“I am so glad I participated in the webinar.  You did a great job of organizing and presenting the material.  I found it very helpful.  I would love to have you speak at one of my classes”

Joni

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“Thank you! for providing such a great class.  Not only informative and useful, but well organized, well paced and excellently documented.  As a designer and general contractor, this was perfect for me.”

Paul

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“Your webinar was extremely well done.  Please put me on your mailing list for future events.  I have recommended to my GC and his electrician that they should attend next month.”

Shelly

Title-24, Title-24

“I enjoyed the webinar presentation, very informative.”

Craig

Title-24, Title-24

“Hey Mark, that was a fine way to spend the morning!  Thanks for doing the webinar, and keep me on the notify list for future ones.”

Gus

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“I thought it was an excellent seminar”

Robin

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“Just a note to let you know how grateful I am for the wealth of knowledge you presented us this morning.  I certainly will be looking forward to more of your webinars in the future”

Gary

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“Thanks again, your ease and proficiency of speaking on these topics is awe inspiring”

Steve

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“Thanks for the webinar, it was great.  Very well done and nicely put together.  Lots of information in a very concise manner.”

Anthony

New Title-24 HVAC Fan Airflow requirements.

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

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The new 2016 Title-24 Energy Code requires that new HVAC systems meet minimum airflow requirements and supply fan efficiencies.

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Studies have shown that a significant number of HVAC installations suffer from low airflow problems.  Typically the main culprit is undersized return air design.

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The new T-24 energy code requires that the airflow at the return be verified by an independent HERS rater to meet the minimum requirement of 350 cfm per ton of A/C capacity.  Installing HVAC contractors will need to make sure their installations will meet this minimum requirement, actually good duct design can result in up to 400 cfm per ton so the State minimum requirement of 350 cfm per ton is not overly restrictive.

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A second option, only available to systems without zoning dampers, is to size the return ducts according to the new Tables 150.0-C and D in the T-24 Efficiency Standards and then have a HERS Rater visually verify that the installed duct system meets the design criteria of those tables.  see tables below:

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Architects CF-1R Signature requirements

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

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The new 2016 Title-24 Energy Code requires that all CF-1R forms must be registered and signed off by the architect/designer of record.

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This process begins with the architect registering with either CalCerts or CHEERS, two of the approved HERS providers in the State.  We suggest you register with both as some of your projects will be uploaded to either provider.

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Registration with either provider is no charge to the architect

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Here is the link for architects to register with CalCerts, the form is called a “Builder Signature Form” but can be used by architects as well:

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Training video: how to register your company with CalCerts

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HERS duct tests are now mandatory statewide

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

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The new 2016 Title-24 Building Efficiency Standards  require mandatory HERS duct testing for all new construction and HVAC changeouts where the ducts are altered.

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In addition minimum airflow requirements must be met and tested by an independant HERS rater.

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We recommend HVAC installers become familiar with these new rules and perform their own “rough-in” duct tests prior to completion of the project to insure the ducts are not leaking before drywall installation.

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Also, remember that all gaps between the supply/return boots and the surrounding drywall must be sealed (caulking is fine) before the HERS duct test.  The HERS rater must visually verify that these gaps are sealed.  Most importantly if they are not sealed it is likely the system will fail the duct tests.

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We are state certified HERS raters, for any questions about duct testing or to schedule us for duct testing on your next project call us at (800) 700-0131

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Or email us at: mark@energycode.com


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2016 Title-24 Energy Code effective January 1, 2017

Friday, August 12th, 2016

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January 1, 2016

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The new 2016 California Title-24 Energy Efficiency Standards have been adopted and will take effect January 1, 2017.

This new update is roughly 25% more restrictive than the 2013 Title-24 energy code currently in force.

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Click here for a detailed summary of the changes:

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Beyond Title-24 payment page

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Beyond Title-24 webinar registration payment page

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Webinar:

Beyond Title-24

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Date:

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014,   9 a.m. to 12 noon

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Webinar fee: $50.00

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To complete registration use PayPal link below:
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February 5th, 2014 Residential Lighting/ASHRAE 62.2 webinar scheduled

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Title-24, Title-24

February 5th,  2014 we will be presenting our monthly 3 hour training Webinar/class that addresses the new changes to the residential Title-24 lighting & ventilation codes.

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The new 2013 Title-24 Building Efficiency Standards becomes effective July 1, 2014.   One of the most sweeping changes in the 2008 Energy Code involved residential indoor and outdoor lighting requirements, particularly kitchen lighting and the new adoption of ASHRAE 62.2 indoor air quality code.  These two codes have been retained for the new 2013 Title-24 Building Efficiency Standards with some significant changes.

Kitchen Lighting, Title-24

New restrictions, control requirements, high efficacy fixture requirements and incandescent allowances, and interior lighting worksheets will add an additional layer of complexity to residential lighting design.  This class will bring you up to speed on the new changes and address the underlying principles, calculation methods, strategies to assist you in complying with the new code changes and take you step by step thru the new CF-2R-LTG-1 lighting certificate of installation which must be filled out before the final certificate of occupancy will be issued.

Kitchen Lighting, Title-24

You will also understand which fixtures will comply as high efficacy (not all LED fixtures are certified as high efficacy), the lighting control requirements for each room type and the new fixture and control requirements for residential outdoor lighting.

Title-24, Title-24

California has now adopted the requirements of ASHRAE 62.2-2007 which means that starting July 1, 2014, all low-rise residential buildings are required to install whole house mechanical ventilation and satisfy other requirements to achieve acceptable indoor air quality.  Openable windows will no longer be an acceptable method for satisfying outdoor air requirements.  This will involve calculations for determining the minimum ventilation cfm and designing a system to provide the necessary airflow with proper controls.  You will learn the proper method for determining ventilation airflow, strategies for designing a cost effective ventilation system, and how to fill out the new ventilation Certificate of Installation.

Kitchen Lighting, Title-24

Learn from one of the leading experts in California’s Title-24 Building Efficiency Standards (Title-24), Mark Madison, a state certified Energy Plans Examiner and Certified Energy Analyst, HERS rater, Greenpoint rater with over 25 years experience with building energy code compliance analysis, enforcement and training.

Title-24, Title-24

Feedback from those who have attended our webinars

Title-24, Title 24

Lighting, Title-24

Webinar fee: $50.00


Kitchen Lighting, Title-24

This class is for architects, interior designers, electricians HVAC contractors, and building officials.

Title-24, Title-24

Location, date, & time:

Webinar

February 5th, 2014

9a.m. to 12 noon

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More upcoming webinars

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Payment Page December 19, 2013, “The New 2013 Title-24 Energy Code Overview”

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

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Registration payment page   (if you haven’t registered yet click here) .We

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To make payment and finalize the registration click the yellow “Buy Now” button below

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$25.00 .

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California 2nd Most energy efficient state in 2013

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Washington, D.C.Energy efficiency measures are thriving in state capitals around the United States, with several states—including Mississippi, Connecticut, Illinois, and West Virginia—taking major steps that moved them up the ranks in the seventh annual edition of the State Energy Efficiency Scorecard released by ACEEE. For the first time in the history of the State Scorecard, the 2013 ranking of the states is being released with the participation of a U.S. Department of Energy secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz, along with a top elected official of a state, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick.

Available online at http://aceee.org/state-policy/scorecard, the State Scorecard shows that the top 10 states for energy efficiency are: Massachusetts, California, New York, Oregon, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, Maryland, and Illinois. Massachusetts retains the top spot for the third year in a row based on its continued commitment to energy efficiency under its Green Communities Act. In California, requirements for reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have led it to identify several strategies for smart growth, keeping the state in a top position at #2. Connecticut is also closing the gap due to passage of a major energy bill in 2013, and Illinois is making its first appearance in the top 10 this year, reaping the benefits of increased energy savings called for in the state’s energy efficiency resource standard.

According to the 2013 State Scorecard, the five states most in need of improvement (starting with dead last) are: North Dakota; Wyoming; South Dakota; Alaska; and Mississippi. However, Mississippi also appears on ACEEE’s list of the top five most improved states, revealing an upward trend as more and more states embrace energy efficiency. Last year Mississippi passed comprehensive energy legislation that included energy efficiency as a major component. The bill included provisions setting an energy code for commercial and state-owned buildings. Mississippi is now set to become a regional leader in energy efficiency. West Virginia’s score improved due to the state adopting stronger building codes. The other three most improved states in 2013 were: Maine, Kansas, and Ohio.

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Dr. Ernest Moniz said: “Energy efficiency is a critical tool for cutting harmful carbon emissions and the best way to reduce energy bills for America’s families. We applaud the continued progress in energy efficiency nationwide and stand ready to help states as they make their communities cleaner and more sustainable, while saving taxpayer dollars and fostering greater economic growth.”

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick said: “Massachusetts continues to lead the nation in energy efficiency because we have made the choice to shape our future, rather than leave it to chance. We will continue to focus on policies that create jobs, decrease dependence on imported energy sources and protect our environment by reducing emissions.”

ACEEE Executive Director Steve Nadel said: “In every region we are seeing states embrace energy saving measures with growing enthusiasm. From Massachusetts, which continues to be the pacesetter in the race to cut down energy waste, to Mississippi, which is emerging as a regional star, state governments are proving that smart policy can still cross partisan divides.”

California Energy Commissioner Andrew McAllister said: “California continues earning its reputation as an energy leader by instituting the nation’s most advanced energy efficiency standards for buildings and appliances, and for pushing the envelope

on ratepayer-funded efficiency programs. Our standards alone have helped save ratepayers more than $75 billion since 1975, grown California’s economy with local jobs, and protected our climate by reducing carbon emissions. ACEEE is providing a valuable service by recognizing energy efficiency leaders that other states can follow. We are proud to be one of the leaders.”

Mississippi Public Service Commissioner and Southeastern Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners President Brandon Presley said: “Cutting down on energy waste has become an integral strategy for securing Mississippi’s energy future, and we are proud to become the most improved state in this year’s State Scorecard. Investing in energy efficiency helps utilities meet growing energy demand, provides reliable service for our customers, and produces economic benefits like energy cost savings. We look forward to seeing Mississippi emerge as a regional leader in tapping the vast economic benefits of energy efficiency.”

In the seventh edition of the State Scorecard, ACEEE ranks states on their energy efficiency policy and program efforts, and provides recommendations for ways that states can improve their energy efficiency performance in a variety of policy areas. The State Scorecard report serves as a benchmark for state efforts on energy efficiency policies and programs each year, encouraging states to strengthen their efficiency commitments as a pragmatic and effective strategy for promoting economic growth, securing environmental benefits, and increasing their communities’ resilience in the face of uncertain energy costs and supplies.

Other Key Findings

Facing uncertain economic times, states are continuing to use energy efficiency as a key strategy to generate cost-savings, promote technological innovation, and stimulate growth. The ACEEE Scorecard documents the following trends:

Several states have made concentrated efforts related to energy efficiency. Arkansas, Indiana, and Pennsylvania continue to reap the benefits of their energy efficiency resource standards (EERS), leading to substantially greater electricity efficiency investments and savings compared to what ACEEE reported in the 2012 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard.

A total of 20 states fell in the rankings in the 2013 State Scorecard report, due to both changes in the report’s methodology and substantive changes in their performance. Idaho fell the furthest, by nine spots, largely because it did not keep up with peer states in utility efficiency spending and savings. Wisconsin dropped six spots, due to a significant drop in energy savings realized by the state’s efficiency program.

Connecticut passed a major energy bill in June 2013, calling for the benchmarking of state buildings, expandingcombined heat and power programs, and doubling funding for energy efficiency programs.

The leading states in utility-sector energy efficiency programs and policies are Massachusetts, Vermont, and Rhode Island. All three of these states have long records of success and continue to raise the bar on the delivery of cost-effective energy efficiency programs and policies.

The leading states in building energy codes and compliance are California, Washington, and Rhode Island. During the past year, seven states adopted the latest iteration of building energy codes.

Methodology

The 2013 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard provides a broad assessment of policies and programs that improve energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, industries, and transportation systems. The State Scorecardexamines the six policy areas in which states typically pursue energy efficiency: utility and “public benefits” programs and policies; transportation polices; building energy codes and compliance; combined heat and power policies; appliance and equipment standards; and state government-led initiatives around energy efficiency.

Editor’s Note

A streaming audio replay of the news event will be available at http://aceee.org/state-policy/scorecard, an electronic copy of the ACEEE 2013 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard report and a high-resolution image of the ACEEE “logo” will be made available upon request on November 6, 2013.


The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy acts as a catalyst to advance energy efficiency policies, programs, technologies, investments, and behaviors.

New webinar: “The New 2013 Title-24 Residential Energy Code”

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

“That was one of the best webinars I’ve ever attended.  Clear, concise, linear, well moderated, and presented.  You’ve got my recommendation if you ever need it.”

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“I just wanted to let you know that I thought the presentation yesterday was excellent!  You presented the material in an engaging fashion, and the information was easy to comprehend.”

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“Your webinar was extremely well done.  Please put me on your mailing list for future events.  I have recommended to my GC and his electrician that they should attend next month.”

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The new 2013 Title-24 Building Efficiency Standards take effect January 1, 2014.  These changes will have a significant impact on building design and construction.  If you’ve been worrying about the new Title-24 energy code this is the webinar you’ve been waiting for!

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The new 2013 Title-24 Energy Code is roughly 20-25% more restrictive than the current 2008 version.

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New forms, new mandatory requirements, and now for the first time solar photovoltaic panels can be used as credits in the compliance analysis.

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This new webinar class will address the big questions from architects, builders, developers, and NSHP applicants:

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How can we cost-effectively comply with the new Title-24 requirements?

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What forms are we responsible for?

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What HERS third party inspections are required and what forms/paperwork are required for these inspections?

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This class will examine new Title-24 compliance strategies and options which can take your project beyond the minimum Title-24 code requirements by 15%, 35% and more for Reach Codes such as LEED and the NSHP.

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Feedback from those who have attended our webinars

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Webinar date:

Monday,  January 20, 2013

9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

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Who should attend:

Architects, designers, contractors, LEED AP’s

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Cost:  Free


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