New 2008 Title-24 Building Efficiency Standards January 1, 2010

January 1, 2010 marks the introduction of the latest version of California’s Title-24 Building Efficiency Standards, officially known as Title-24, Part 6.   Originally slated to take effect in August then pushed back to October of this year, delays in the compliance software necessitated delaying enforcement of the new code until January 1, 2010.   Two new components of the new energy code will introduce new compliance forms that will add an additional layer of complexity to the compliance process.  The first is the adoption of AHSRAE 62.2-2007 which means that for the first time in California all low-rise residential buildings are required to provide not only local exhaust for bathrooms and kitchens but also provide whole house mechanical ventilation to address poor indoor air quality that ironically has been an unanticipated side effect of improvements in the energy code over the past twenty years.

Title-24, Title-24

As buildings became tighter with less air infiltration occupants were exposed to increasing levels of moisture, mold and the toxic out-gassing of chemicals from carpeting, laminated wood products, paints and adhesives common in newly constructed dwellings.  The state building code has always mandated a minimum level of open-able window area per room to allow for natural ventilation but those living in more severe climate zones simply were not using these windows for ventilation preferring to keep the windows and doors closed tight and rely on their air conditioning or furnace while indoor air quality suffered.  Increases in cases of allergies and asthma have been directly linked to poor indoor air quality in the home which is often many times worse than the ambient outdoor air.

Title-24, Title-24

Starting January 1, 2010 in addition to the existing local exhaust code requirement the new ASHRAE 62.2 ventilation code will require designers to calculate a minimum level if air changes per hour and install either a continuously operating, quiet fan that will constantly introduce a measured flow of fresh air into the home or specify an intermittently operating fan with a smart control that cycles the fan on and off during a 24 hour period to provide the same minimum level of fresh air into the dwelling.  ASHRAE 62.2 will apply to all new residential low-rise construction, three stories or less, and for additions larger than 1,000 sq. ft.

Title-24, Title-24

Another looming headache for the unprepared is the expanded number of Certificates of Installation, CF-6R forms.  Introduced during the 2005 Title-24 code cycle these forms are intended to provide accountability to ensure that the building’s energy features are correctly installed.  There are now 26 unique CF-6R forms for the three primary categories of energy features: building envelope, mechanical, and lighting measures.  Any contractor or specialty subcontractor must complete these construction certificates verifying that the contractor is aware of the requirements of the building energy standards and they have followed the proper procedures for installation.

Title-24, Title-24

  • HVAC system: The contractor who installs mechanical equipment signs this part. Heating and cooling equipment are listed and the energy efficiency, capacity, design loads of each piece of equipment are documented.
  • Water Heating Systems. This part includes information about the water heating equipment including model number, energy efficiency, tank size, and input rating. The installer also verifies that faucets and shower heads are certified and comply with the appliance standards.
  • Fenestration/Glazing. This part includes a list of all windows installed in the home. For each, the U-factor, SHGC, area, number of panes, and number of windows of this type in the building are indicated. This page is signed by the contractor that installs the windows.
  • Duct Leakage and Design Diagnostics. This part is signed by the contractor responsible for installing the HVAC ducts, verifying that they comply with the leakage requirements. On this form the contractor includes the results of their own duct test, which will later be verified by a third-part inspector (HERS rater).
  • Insulation Certificate. This part is completed and signed by the contractor when credit is taken for quality insulation installation then later verified by a third party inspector (HERS rater).
  • Lighting Systems. This part is completed and signed by the contractor responsible for installing hard-wired lighting system.

Title-24, Title-24

A copy of the completed signed and dated CF-6R forms must be posted at the building site for review by the enforcement agency during the final inspection of the building.  Failure to provide a completed and CF-6R form will hold up the occupancy approval as well has delay any necessary HERS verification inspections/tests such as duct testing as the HERS rater must have a completed and signed CF-6R in order to register the project with the state HERS provider, either CHEERS or CalCERTS.

Title-24, Title-24

For the past few years many building departments have fairly lax in requesting completed and signed CF-6R forms.  Starting January 1, 2010 expect significantly more rigorous enforcement as the compliance and legal language have been toughened.  Also numerous HERS verification inspections cannot be performed without a completed and signed CF-6R form which means contractors can expect some urgent phone calls from HERS raters requesting completed and signed CF-6R forms so the HERS rater can complete their inspections.  Utility incentives can also be held up as they also require these documents.

Title-24, Title-24

Training:

Because of the widespread lack of understanding in completing the CF-6R forms there are available a number of training seminars to train contractors and building officials in filling out and planchecking the CF-6R forms.  For details on our upcoming webinars on this subject click here.

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply

*